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Gone Fly Fishing
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1873 Maynard Long Range
Apr 23rd, 2013 at 10:03pm
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This is an exclusive Maynard rifle worthy of your viewing.  I greatly appreciate the pistol grip attachment to the lever and will fashion one to replicate what I assume to be a factory original shown.

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C.M.M.
  
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ssrifles
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #1 - Apr 23rd, 2013 at 10:13pm
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i used to own this gun.it came with all you see there except the sight case and the man that bought it from me made it,and he said he wouldn't do another way to much time and work.i  really hated to sell it but something came up and i had to.it is in a good home and really appreciated.and yes it was not cheap.
   tony <><
  
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J.Francis
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #2 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 6:17am
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I have an Arthur Hubalek custom Martini in 22L.R. with a similar lever treatment; it's a neat way to get a pistol grip without a lot of metal bending.
  
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graduated peep
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #3 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 7:02am
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What is the metal attachment behind the tang sight, a thumb rest ???
  

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John in PA
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #4 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 7:52am
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Very interesting rifle.  Not sure I've seen a Creedmoor model before.  The thumbrest certainly is unique.  I guess it's there to keep the sight from biting the shooter's hand (or for a more secure/comfortable grip?) Looking closely, I was trying to figure out if it was oriented for a right or left handed shooter?  I also wondered if the large diameter barrel necessitated changing the dimensions of the trough in the frame?
  

John Wells
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #5 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 8:27am
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Quote:
i used to own this gun.it came with all you see there except the sight case
   tony <><


Good Morning Tony--

Thanks for identifying the Maynard Creedmoor as one that you owned in the past.

Would you care to add a few words describing how the rifle shoot, either at 200 yards or beyond.  I'd be interested in knowing that.

C.M.M.
  
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Deadeye Bly
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #6 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 10:17am
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John in PA, the barrel is 1 1/16" diameter at the breech and does not require any modification of the frame. The octagon barrels are only octagon on the top 5 flats, the bottom is round and is the 1 1/16" diameter. The octagon part is the maximum size to get the corners sharp. Those Creedmoor barrels only had about 1/32" taper to them and were 32" long. The max weight for a Creedmoor gun was 10 lbs and the Maynards met the weight. Records indicate that only one was ever used at Creedmoor and that was in the "walkover" match several years after the famous match in which we beat the Irish team.
  
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ssrifles
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #7 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 5:35pm
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cmm
  i never shot it.i was collecting creedmoors and that was one of many i had.i saw a display of several different long ranges and all the goodies that went with them at a small show in pennsylvania 20 + years ago and wanted one like it.i came real close to it.i was in commercial renovations and when the bottom fell out several years ago i was offered more for them than i could turn down.i seem to still get one every now and then.
                      tony <><
  
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #8 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 6:01pm
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cmm
  i never shot it.i was collecting creedmoors and that was one of many i had.i saw a display of several different long ranges and all the goodies that went with them at a small show in pennsylvania 20 + years ago and wanted one like it.tony <><


Evening Tony:

I try, within reason, to make those small Pennsylvania gun shows that the various gun and fishing clubs put on, as you once did.  I've concluded that it's really a waste on one's time to look for exclusive firearms at such shows.  I would rather send those club's my $7.00 to $10.00 door admission fees in the mail, and save my gas for other trips.

Even though you did not shoot this Creedmoor rifle, I know it brought you much enjoyment and pleasure while it belonged to you.

C.M.M.
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #9 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 6:36pm
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it did,with all the goodies it displayed very nice.it's got where most small shows aren't worth the time.jewelry and bar b que sauce.
  
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #10 - Apr 24th, 2013 at 10:03pm
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The Maynard long range is certainly an exotic firearms collectible.  I wouldn't shoot it either. Why suffer.  Wink

            Joe.  Smiley



  

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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #11 - Apr 25th, 2013 at 3:25am
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graduated peep wrote on Apr 24th, 2013 at 7:02am:
What is the metal attachment behind the tang sight, a thumb rest ???


I believe John in PA has it correct, it is to allow the thumb of the shooters right hand to encompass the stock yet prevent tang sight base 'bite' when the rifle is fired. The nice thing about it is that it appears to be ambidextrous in design. Loosen the holding screw and simply rotate the thumb protector over to the left and tighten it up again.  Cool

Harry
  
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #12 - Apr 25th, 2013 at 7:25am
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   I have been waiting to for someone to comment of the rear, tang mounted, sight, but apparently it has been over-looked except for those of us who have more than a passing interest in Maynard firearms, which many people have for years considered to be oddities.

  The Maynard catalogs referred to the Long Range Creedmoor Rifle as a No. 14, either Model 1873 or Model 1882 and being chambered in .44 caliber.  The unique rear sight is elevated with a rack and pinion mechanical arrangement, rather than the more common screw thread found elsewhere.  I am not certain that the sight described and shown was actually made by Massachusetts Arms Co. since it may well have been sub-contracted out to a third party manufactured.  What is for certain is the fact that Doctor Maynard initiated the rack and pinion elevation for his arms.

C.M.M.

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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #13 - Apr 25th, 2013 at 2:13pm
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Gone Fly Fishing wrote on Apr 25th, 2013 at 7:25am:
   I have been waiting to for someone to comment of the rear, tang mounted, sight, but apparently it has been over-looked except for those of us who have more than a passing interest in Maynard firearms, which many people have for years considered to be oddities.

  The Maynard catalogs referred to the Long Range Creedmoor Rifle as a No. 14, either Model 1873 or Model 1882 and being chambered in .44 caliber.  The unique rear sight is elevated with a rack and pinion mechanical arrangement, rather than the more common screw thread found elsewhere.  I am not certain that the sight described and shown was actually made by Massachusetts Arms Co. since it may well have been sub-contracted out to a third party manufactured.  What is for certain is the fact that Doctor Maynard initiated the rack and pinion elevation for his arms.

C.M.M.


CMM,
I'm not so sure about the Rack and Pinion elevation for the tang site being Dr. Maynards idea. An identical sight was patented by a certain Mr. Hadley (of Hadley Disc fame). I've lost everything about the patent except for a few of the Patent Drawings. I'll try and attach some of them.

Harry
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Patent number: 172465
Filing date: 8 Dec 1875
Issue date: 18 Jan 1876

Harry
« Last Edit: Apr 25th, 2013 at 2:49pm by harry_eales »  
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Re: 1873 Maynard Long Range
Reply #14 - Apr 25th, 2013 at 8:30pm
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Quote:
  What is for certain is the fact that Doctor Maynard initiated the rack and pinion elevation for his arms.
C.M.M.


Good Evening Harry:

Sorry to have put you to the task of digging into your files on my behalf for wanting me to have the most up to-date and accurate information possible when it comes to the topic of very fine Maynand rifle and shot arms.

As you, and most other alert people know, the rack and pinion mechanism predates the birth of Christ and was used during the time of the Roman empire in all manner of wars and civilizations.  The catapults for throwing boulders were based in part on the mechanical advantages to be realized from the rack and pinion mechanism.

Respectfully, if you will simply re-read my above quotation it will become evident to you that I am pointing out to the reader that Doctor Maynard made a conscious decision to use the rack and pinion to raise and lower his sight aperture to the exclusion of other possibilities available for doing so, i.e., the threaded rod being just one of those options.

I believe that it is self evident from my statement that I was never under the impression that Doctor Maynard invented the rack and pinion mechanism, nor that he was the first and or only person to apply that particular mechanism for use with firearms sights.

He was a bright inventor and had more than able  patent counsel on retainer at the time.  I have no doubts that if he had been counseled to make patent application for the sight, he would have done so without hesitation.

C.M.M..
  
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