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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Almost complete Hepburn... (Read 2066 times)
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Almost complete Hepburn...
Jun 13th, 2017 at 9:06pm
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Had a few moments, thought I'd share...

This was a last winter project that almost got completed.  Had to shoot it in a semi finished condition at the Baker "Big Hill Buffalo Shoot" this last weekend. 
The wood is a semi from Treebone in Maple, the barrel is a Badger, the sight was mine, in a 40-82 Win.  and as per usual, the rifle shot very well, hit steel every time I kept the sight on it. 
Maybe I'll finish it?
  

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marlinguy
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #1 - Jun 13th, 2017 at 11:43pm
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Wow! That's a beauty, and can only get better once the finish is applied!
  

Vall
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SBoomer
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #2 - Jun 14th, 2017 at 9:16am
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That's goint to be beautiful when finished! Love the wood.
  
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #3 - Jun 14th, 2017 at 1:18pm
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Thanks for the votes of confidence  Smiley  I have safes full of rifles that the machine work is finished, the stocks are inletted and a few have the cheek piece finished so I don't get scuffed when I shoot it, there's only a handful that have made it all the way to completion...
I'm not a huge fan of maple especially for a Hepburn but the blank was just lying around...  I'm thinking the barrel is going to finish in brown and re-color case the receiver, does anyone have a tried and true method of browning that would give this the 120 year old appearance she deserves?
Thanks.
  

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Bill Lawrence
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #4 - Jun 14th, 2017 at 8:02pm
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While there are several fine commercially-available browning solutions that other forum members will likely passionately recommend, the best I've ever used is the one attributed in R. H. Angier's Firearm Blueing and Browning to Schoyen.  Several key components have old-time monikers that you may need Google to translate and which will likely no longer be available at your local drug store.  Nevertheless, in my opinion, if you follow the directions, the resulting velvety-deep finish is worth your time and effort.

Bill Lawrence
  
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marlinguy
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #5 - Jun 15th, 2017 at 10:27am
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Schoyen's barrel browning was the finest I've ever seen! Don't know what his solution was, but his barrels have the deepest dark chocolate brown finish I've ever seen!
  

Vall
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #6 - Jun 15th, 2017 at 1:35pm
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Bill,
Thanks for the reply, I have that book from years gone by and I've studied some of the recipes, even picked the brain of an older apothecary guru once for some translations (before Sir Google came along).  I fiddled with one solution if I recall and I'm not remembering what it was and I can't find my notes... I still have the barrel I experimented on I think - not sure it's quite what I want.
Vall,
That's what I'm hoping for, somebody else that has been successful duplicating Schoyen's browning.  I've seen a few muzzleloaders with the finish I'd like, but since I'm needing it, I'm not finding it. 
Can a guy use a cabinet, fume it with nitric, card it, repeat and not go to the boiling water for color? Then pickle? seal with shelac?  Somebody here does this all the time I'm sure.
Greg
  

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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #7 - Jun 15th, 2017 at 3:41pm
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page 261 the muzzle-loading cap lock rifle ned roberts
1 1/2 oz Spirits of wine
1 1/2 oz tincure of steel
1/2 oz corrosive sublimate
1 1/2 oz sweet spirits of nitre
1oz vitrol
3/4 nitric acid
  
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marlinguy
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #8 - Jun 15th, 2017 at 10:23pm
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From my futile attempts to brown using Birchwood Casey's browning solution, I couldn't get it to stop flash rusting when I didn't boil it. I thought I could run it under my wife's laundry sink with water temps of around 135 degrees, but a few days later it was rusty, and I had to strip it. Not sure if varnish, or sealer would stop it, but also not sure if the sealer would look good either.
Had a friend who didn't have a tank to boil in, but made a container from PVC and poured boiling water over the barrel. Repeated a second time and his worked out OK.
  

Vall
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #9 - Jun 16th, 2017 at 12:03am
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I have browned and rust blued a few barrels, but I'm no expert by any means. Whether browning or rust bluing the same solution can be used to achieve the desired color, either brown or black.

Boiling the barrel between coats of whatever you're using to rust the barrel will result in a rust blued barrel. When browning a barrel I have scrubbed it down after the final application of browning solution with very hot water and baking soda to neutralize the acid that rusts the barrel.

Like I said, I'm no expert and maybe this is all wrong but that's how my friend showed me to brown or rust blue a barrel. I just don't want anyone to spoil their browning project by boiling their barrel.

I used to use Wahkon Bay Browning Reagent for browning but I don't think it's available anymore. It was a very slow rust brown but had a very pleasing color. Track Of The Wolf used to sell it but now they offer this product that I suspect will be a good one to use.

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Forgot to mention, that's a fine looking Hepburn you have.

JerryH
« Last Edit: Jun 16th, 2017 at 1:35am by JerryH »  

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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #10 - Jun 16th, 2017 at 10:42am
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Try linseed oil to seal a brown job. 30W non-detergent motor oil to seal a blue job.
Rinse a brown job well in warm water with a little scrubbing. Baking soda does not hurt.
Let both sealers sit over night then wipe off.
Have ruined brown jobs with very hot water.
Chuck
  
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #11 - Jun 17th, 2017 at 12:19am
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Vall, I tried some of the over the counter stuff like this I'd picked up at the Mart brothers stores and such, generally took me to  my limits on frustration. 
I have used most of Brownells bluing methods with good to great success.  I've even experimented with different methods of rust bluing and discovered a few tricks - at altitudes greater than 4000 ft. (where I'm at) I aerated the water with oxygen before boiling and the rust formed better and the bluing seemed to go deeper.  I just never pursued going for "brown"

Jerry, This is what I was looking for, someone who has time on grade with different methods and products, the soda makes sense.  Thanks for some insights.  I'm going to try Tracks, and Laurel Mountain's solution.

Chuck, I've heard about the water being too hot, experienced it bluing with oxynate #7, so thanks for that heads up.  Appreciate the info about the linseed, I remember hearing or reading about one or the other to seal it up - boiled or raw, does it make any difference?

If I recall, one can wipe or paint the barrel bore with shellac and allowed to cure, it protects the bore from any rust and it's removed with acetone or xylene when all is done, saves risking the corks and stoppers coming loose.  Does anyone have first hand experience with this or was this a random thought I had and it's all gibberish? 
G
  

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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #12 - Jun 17th, 2017 at 1:22am
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I use Laurel Mountain for my rust bluing. It's easy to work with and produces a nice color. A friend/forum member sent me this link to some products that look very interesting and I plan to try them.

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As far as the linseed oil (boiled) to seal the barrel, my friend cuts it 50/50 with mineral spirits. I use BreakFree or EEZOX with equal success.

When browning a barrel I plug the muzzle and breach with a hardwood plug. Rust bluing I plug the muzzle with a hardwood plug and use a piece of rubber hose and copper tubing to plug the chamber and create a periscope so when the barrel gets boiled the plugs don't blow out because of pressure. I liberally oil the barrel before installing the muzzle plug and breech periscope.

Don't sand/polish any finer than 320 so there's something for the browning/bluing agent to bite into. Going beyond 320 only prolongs the browning/bluing process in my experience.

There are a lot of ways to skin a cat. Most of them work just fine, and the cat always ends up skinned.

JerryH
« Last Edit: Jun 17th, 2017 at 2:02am by JerryH »  

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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #13 - Jun 17th, 2017 at 12:19pm
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Certainly agree about the cat. Ron Long had a solution that used citric acid. Never tried it.
Interesting periscope idea. My plugs either leak or difficult to remove.
I use two or three coats of shellac on a clean bore and not so tight plugs. Remove shellac with denatured alcohol.
Chuck
  
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Re: Almost complete Hepburn...
Reply #14 - Jun 17th, 2017 at 1:20pm
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As to the plugs I taper them slightly then using a drill bit a little smaller than a screw , drill into the plug , but not all the way through . Fit the plug into the barrel, then screw in the screw. The screw expands the hard wood so the plug won't fall out. Also can wrap a hanger wire on the screw to suspend the barrel inthe boiling tank.
Works for me anyway .
Richard
  

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