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texasmac
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Importing a rifle from Canada
Sep 13th, 2017 at 6:05pm
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I ran across a very good deal on a $1600 Browning BPCR Creedmoor .45-90 located in Canada. Since I’ve shipped a few Browning’s to exporters for delivery to Australia I had some idea of the cost, which the buyer paid, but thought that transferring from Canada would be less costly. After checking with a couple of well-known exporters/importers (Borderview International & Irunguns,LLC) that are setup to handle Canadian transfers I was somewhat surprised by the fees as follows:

Borderview: $299 + 5% of the firearms value + 3.1% of the firearms value (since the rifle was manufactured in Japan) +shipping to their British Columbia location + shipping to a USA based FFL local to the buyer. An additional fee of $25 to $50 would be charged by the FFL to transfer the rifle to the buyer. In addition the rifle is laser engraved with the importing information. So the total fee is approximately $520.00.

Irunguns: Essentially the same requirements as above but the base fee is $200 & no additional 5%. The rifle is laser engraved with the importing information. The resulting fee is approximately $340.00.

I did not ask about firearms going from the US to Canada but, per US Customs requirements, the ones imported from Canada must be marked with the importers name, city & state. Borderview typically laser-engraves rifles in front of & close to the forearm with “BV LYNDEN WA” in small very uniform letters. They emailed me photo examples of nicely done engravings using very small font sizes & very uniform characters. Following are Borderview’s email comments:

“Thank you for your call today about our firearm import services. I have attached some sample photos of the required import markings that we have done. Please keep in mind that the ATF requires make, model, caliber and country of origin as well as the serial number to be marked on the gun. If any of those markings are missing, or not in English, we would be required to mark that information as well. We do the markings to the minimum height and depth allowed, and we are willing to work with you concerning placement, provided it meets the provisions of the ATF. Please let me know if you have any questions. Again, thank you for contacting us.”

Irunguns uses the same technique but typically engraves the receiver with “IRUNGUNS LAKE HAVASU AZ” using font sizes similar to the factory information. Irunguns says they can engrave the barrel rather than the receiver at the buyer’s request.

Wayne
« Last Edit: Sep 14th, 2017 at 9:30pm by texasmac »  

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marlinguy
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but they sure are neater!

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Re: Importing a rifle from Canada
Reply #1 - Sep 14th, 2017 at 5:45pm
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Sounds like a bargain gun can become expensive fast! And forget about anything collectible, since the engraving would ruin that value!
  

Vall
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boats
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Re: Importing a rifle from Canada
Reply #2 - Sep 14th, 2017 at 7:12pm
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One of the big box stores even  the largest, pays about 75 dollars brokers fee per standard customs entry, anything out of the ordinary adds extra fees.  Fish and Wildlife if CITES restricted, Department of AG inspections if a food p oduct etc. This just for the Brokers paperwork .   If Customs decides to inspect a container it cost 300 or more labor, Customs officer looks, does not pick up boxes, contractors do the work.  Large importers save money by grouping a number of containers on one entry. Spreading cost over many products . Duty is assessed acording to value volume makes no difference. Fees are per entry

Firearm the paperwork is the same one gun or a container full, you can expect to pay 200-500 in fees. 20 years ago Bringing my Anschutz SB Prone rifle in from Australia fees were 225 dollars. Freight not included. The Action was stamped Neil Johnson Bolder CO.

Government has run paperwork to crazy levels. My first Coast Guard License in 1969 was free Physical and all. Renewal license today cost nearly 3000 dollars in fees to third parties before its presented to the CG License office for review and issue.

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oodmoff
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Re: Importing a rifle from Canada
Reply #3 - Sep 20th, 2017 at 2:48pm
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IIRC, I believe that if the gun can be proven to be antique then the laser markings are not required and thus the value is not diminished.  There is still an import fee and it must be transferred thru the appropriate dealers with the appropriate form filled out and proof of dob.  This makes moving a old lever action gun such as a Winchester viable, but not an old Stevens 44.   I seem to recall reading some confusing data regarding restrictions based upon bore size, but don't recall, been a while since I breached the topic and It most certainly could have changed in the last few years.   I realize this does not pertain the original post, but was more in response to Vall's comments

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« Last Edit: Sep 20th, 2017 at 3:07pm by oodmoff »  
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