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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Rust Blueing (Read 1304 times)
Myers
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Rust Blueing
Apr 20th, 2019 at 8:29am
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who would you use and why?
  
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KFW
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #1 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 8:39am
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I would do it my self, easy and cheap to do. The home made sweat box cost is basically nothing and a wire wheel lasts forever.
  
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Chuckster
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #2 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 9:38am
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Do my own rust blue but would suggest Mike Hunter at
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Excellent work and prompt turnaround from my experience.
Chuck
  
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rodneys
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #3 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 9:41am
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If you use the Mark Lee express blue or the Laurel Mountain rust blue all you need is a tank to boil you distilled water. I put about 8 coats in less than a hour, turns out great. we just did a couple of 22's in my rifle smithing class. no sweat box needed like the traditional method.
  
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Dales
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #4 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 9:48am
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What method do you use to plug your barrel while boiling ? I have used a wooden plug but never been happy with it.
Dales
  
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Crown-C
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #5 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 10:12am
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Dale,
I used to use the wooden plugs too, but now using threaded rods with rubber gaskets on the ends. Just tighten the nuts on the ends to seal it. I bought several different diameters rods for different calibers.
Richard
  

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marlinguy
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #6 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 11:47am
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I only use Al Springer at Snowy Mountain Blue. Extremely reasonable pricing, quick turnaround on polished parts, and the best work I've had done.
Some great pictures at his web site:

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Chuckster
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #7 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 12:31pm
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Dales, I coat the bore with a couple of layers of shellac, then wooden plugs before boiling.
Not too tight on the plugs because they will swell.
Shellac easily removed with denatured alcohol when complete.
Chuck
  
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GT
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #8 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 1:32pm
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I agree with the Shellac, coat the bore and threads and I haven't even been using any plugs for rust bluing or the Damascus etching (it leaves a very pronounced line). 
Greg
  

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chipmaker
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #9 - Apr 20th, 2019 at 2:34pm
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If you use the Mark Lee express blue, the rusting is immediate and the parts go right back into the water. It usually take me a couple of hours to rust blue a barrel and I can see no difference between slow and express rust blued barrels.
I never plug or coat the inside of the barrel and only apply the rusting solution to the outside. I've never seen any rust / blue inside the barrel but will check with the bore scope the next time that I rust blue a barrel.
Otto
  
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CW
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #10 - Apr 23rd, 2019 at 11:40pm
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Interesting timing on this. Just yesterday I completed my first slow rust blue job on a BPCR barrel. I have a few more to do.
I used the Laurel Mountain browning product.

Wanting to try a few things and not worrying about how it turned out I made a few errors. One of the rust cycles I got a little too aggressive resulting in a heavy rust. It still turned out good, just not outstanding. I may redo this barrel next winter. I want to move on to the others now that I have a good idea what to expect.

Also, sometime in the future I may give the Mark Lee express blue a shot.
  
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CW
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #11 - Apr 23rd, 2019 at 11:43pm
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Here is a shot of the completed rifle...
  
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CW
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #12 - Apr 30th, 2019 at 12:01pm
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I am near completing my second barrel. A Badger half octagon 50-90 SS for a Remington rolling block hunting rifle. The first barrel I experimented on liberally as I worked through six cycles of rust, boil and card. I will be redoing it again at some point but it was my "try" barrel and all and all, it really did not turn out all that bad. The one heavy rust cycle burned down through for lack of a better term and I was never able to get it to reblend back in.

This second barrel job is going fine. Not professional by any means but will be a good blue job. I have completed three rust coats and two cardings and the does barrel looks great where it looks great. The few problems with it are in the application overlap seams or where I have stopped and started to get past dovetails. Applying the Laural Mtn solution evenly from muzzle to breach works well for the most part but I do get a slight line showing up in some cases running long-wise with the barrel after carding. Also, I have found that any stutter or incomplete whetting like on the end of a pass that has to be fixed by touching it again shows up as a small imperfection later. I may need to get a better application set-up, maybe a cradle to hold the barrel and easily turn it in order to get long, complete passes. I still am wondering what to do about the overlaps as I coat the five or six passes to get solution applied all around the barrel.
This current 50 cal barrel will get a few more cycles and that may even it out - or not.

Professional level work would be zero imperfection found anywhere and I am not there yet.

I am taking down and preparing the rolling block action, lots of pitting and banged up areas. It would look best color cased but I will blue it too and see how it turns out. It will take some work to prepare. The lower tang/trigger guard will be some work getting it looking good.  The hours spent doing that interest me the least. It is about as exciting as washing pots and pans but I just have to make myself not quit early and stick with it to get out all the flaws.
-CW
  
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Old-Win
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #13 - May 1st, 2019 at 9:14am
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CW, LMF is a good product for browning barrels but is a little too aggressive for me when rust bluing and can get away from you pretty fast if you don't stay on top of it.  Mark Lee has a good product and it works very well when doing his Express Blue method.  I took a class from him and you can do a barrel, start to finish in 2 hours.  To reduce runs and keep the finish uniform on an octagon barrel, pick up some of the little foam paint brushes with the wood handle and put some of your solution in the lid of a jar and dip the brush in your solution. Have some paper towel folded up and blot the brush on the paper towel to see if your brush is too wet.  The brush will help you keep the solution more uniform as you apply it.  I hang my barrels from a nail on a rafter and that helps me go from top to bottom in one stroke. I like that color case.  Looks very original.  Who did it? Bob
  
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marlinguy
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Re: Rust Blueing
Reply #14 - May 1st, 2019 at 9:22am
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Usually overlap showing up in rust bluing is a sign the application was put on too wet. You should wet your cotton ball, and then wring it out as dry as possible before applying the solution. Also do the passes in one direction. Not too many passes before grabbing another cotton ball and repeating.
I like to use hooks that insert into the bore on each end and then hang the barrel above my bench while I apply solution. Then the same hooks allow me to take it down, and move it while holding the hooks. This way I have less chance of getting anything on the surface accidentally while moving it around.
  

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