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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) On the horns of a dilemma (Read 4300 times)
Mick B
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #45 - May 27th, 2019 at 9:05pm
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Chris
I admire you for your respect for tradition, I respect it as well which is why I use BP in the cartridges that were loaded with BP originally. To me a 45-70 loaded  with 4227, or whatever, is not a 45-70, it's as simple as that.
Mike.
PS  They used to say that if you understand V8 s no explanation is necessary, if you don't, no explanation is possible, the same goes for tradition in my opinion.
  
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MartiniBelgian
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #46 - May 28th, 2019 at 2:39am
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Mick,

As to the 1st creedmoor match, as the Irish were using ML rifles, just the act of loading (pushing a wad down the barrel) actually constitutes a form of cleaning, shoving the fouling down the bore.  Could be pretty important, as seating a PP bullet in fouled bore, you run the risk of shoving the bullet through the patch  Smiley.
Will PP shoot more accurately?  perhaps not, but it is a good way to avoid bore leading and any grease issues, and I for one don't believe in the barrel wear theory - most certainly not with modern steels used currently. 
FWIW, when I shoot at my outdoor range, it can be pretty windy and dry, so there always is the issue of dust blowing around.  A target cartridge usually has some GG's exposed, so there is always a risk of it picking up some dust.
FWIW, while it is true that at a certain point in time, the NRA (UK) prohibited cleaning between shots, this didn't mean that there was no fouling management - blowtubing was still allowed, and used.  Which is when Metford segmental rifling gained an edge, as it had no sharp corners so didn't retain fouling as some other rifling types.  FWIW, Henry rifling actually is a fouling trap - septagonal bore with triangular lands in the corners, pretty deep too.  I shoot a few rifles with Henry rifling, I know...
The best for shooting dirty was reputed to be the Lancaster oval bore rifling - apparently they once did a test with a ML rifle, shooting a blank to foul the barrel, followed by normal cartridges, the rifle getting progressively 'cleaner' with every shot...  Would like to try oval bore rifling, but no one makes it AFAIK.
  
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Mick B
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #47 - May 28th, 2019 at 2:54am
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MartiniBelgian
My friends Rigby has it loading instructions with it and from memory ( shaky ) it was a card wad over the powder, followed by a lubricated wad, and then the bullet. I think the rifle was loaded through a false muzzle so you could load a pretty tight combination without damaging the patch.
I had a look in the barrel and the rifling was very shallow, like about .002" whether it got that way from a lot of shooting I have no idea, perhaps it was like that from day one.
I think one other thing is worthy of mention and that is that the powder they were using was supposed burned moist, or left a moist residue, making it easier for the card wad to clean the barrel better on the way down. I think that in the UK the weather is probably a lot moister than it is here in Australia, so that could explain that.
Probably an easy thing to test if you happen to have an original can of Curtis & Harvey's powder laying around.
Mike.
  
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Mick B
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #48 - Jun 16th, 2019 at 11:51pm
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I just had another thought, what if I just got my existing chamber re lined, this would probably be cheaper than having the barrel set back and then re chambered. Anybody know if this is problematic in any way ?.
I would like to contact Wayne at some time as I believe he is the guru on 40-65 chambers and Hi Walls, does anyone have an email contact number please.
MIke.
  
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Longdistance1
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #49 - Jun 17th, 2019 at 4:01pm
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Mike,  to find out if your barrel is worth saving,  neck size and expand a few of your brass for a slip fit for your bullets,  wrap the neck of the case with scotch tape or electrical tape to be a slip fit into the chamber, load the cases and fire them at a target if you don't get a decent group use the bbl for a jack handle.
LD1
  
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Mick B
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #50 - Jun 17th, 2019 at 8:38pm
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LDI
Someone suggested something similar a while ago and I have already wrapped one case,but then I got sidetracked with another idea. However I intend to do as you suggested in the near future.
For what it's worth I don't think there is all that much wrong with the barrel because when I shoot it breech seated I can get fairly regular sub 1" groups on reasonable days.
Buying a new barrel in the US, then having it profiled and chambered etc, then paying about US$380 for an export permit, plus freight and insurance makes a new barrel a very expensive option, I forgot, there is also Duty and sales tax at my end, based on the cost of the barrel, including the all the work done to it and the export permit cost.
Mike.
  
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Longdistance1
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #51 - Jun 18th, 2019 at 12:50am
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Mike  if your barrel will shoot well with the taped up brass,  you could have a machinist make a chamber liner out of 4140  bored out to your bbls bore diameter and install it into your bored out bbl with some sleeve installing locktite, rechamber it to 40-65. Only big cost would be the chamber reamer and import fees for it.
LD1
  
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Mick B
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #52 - Jun 18th, 2019 at 8:46am
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LD1
That is an option I'm also considering that I can run past the gunsmith.
Mike.
  
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Old-Win
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #53 - Jun 18th, 2019 at 9:54am
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Mick, I just got home from the Quigley rifle shoot last night and I picked up a card from one of the companies that will turn brass for you to your rifle.  They would like a chamber cast which would be best or very good dimensions for an expanded case.  I will p.m. you the information so you can contact them. They are still waiting for their export permit but it should be coming pretty soon. Bob
  
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Mick B
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #54 - Jun 18th, 2019 at 9:15pm
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Old Win
Bob, I found an add in the last issue of The Single Shot Exchange magazine for a company called RCC Brass and an email address at (You need to Login or Register to view media files and links) if this is who you spoke to ?. I emailed them yesterday, In my email I explained my chamber problem and asked if they could make me cases with thicker necks, also would they require a chamber cast and a fired case from my rifle. So far I have not received a reply.
Mike.
  
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Old-Win
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Re: On the horns of a dilemma
Reply #55 - Jun 18th, 2019 at 10:42pm
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That's the one.
  
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