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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall (Read 999 times)
westerner
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #15 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 10:40am
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StanR5686 wrote on Nov 19th, 2021 at 2:37pm:
I知 sure this has probably been addressed until people are tired of reading it. I apologize for my repetition. I知 looking at two different rifles. An 1874 Sharps and an 1885 High Wall. Both replicas in .45-70. I知 not going to be competing. Where I live in East Texas I値l have to look for a 500 yard shot. Most of mine would be 350 +/-. I just want one of these type rifles for my own enjoyment. I realize people have their own preferences and swear by one or the other. I知 just wondering if there is any great advantage in one over the other. I have read, looked at videos and asked questions trying to do my homework so to speak. Any recommendations or things to consider that I may have missed will be appreciated.


I have both. Just for fun, it would have to be the Sharps. Older design, made the West safe for Winchester, great history.  Seems everyone has one or two.

In actual fact my favorite old style big bore is the rolling block. The unique way it locks up and the looks. A sleek weird old gun.   

When shooting BPCRS, I can't say which has the advantage.
  

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Bulseyetom
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #16 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 12:59pm
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Joe that is a mighty fine looking Roller!  Tom
  
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George Babits
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #17 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 5:27pm
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Westerner,
That is a really nice Remington.   I have to agree with you on  Remington being a lot "sleeker" and lighter than the Sharps.   I think both were equally used on the buffalo range, though the Sharps got the credit, or at least better press than the Remington, and others.   I think I have about as many Remington as Sharps rifles.   One of the sleekest single shots was the Peabody and, while they weren't "buffalo rifles"  I really enjoy shooting them as well. 

Bottom line for the original poster is that there a lot of fish in the pond besides the Sharps and High Wall;  that's just what is being imported.

George
  
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StanR5686
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #18 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 5:44pm
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Since starting this thread and discussion, I have found that C. Sharps Arms in Big Timber, MT makes an 1885. Looks like they are entirely made there. Prices are from $600 to $800 more than the Italian replicas and are about the same as I知 seeing Miroku made Brownings and Winchesters for. Has anybody had any experience with C. Sharp 1885s? I would pay that difference if I knew it was a quality made rifle.
  
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #19 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 5:46pm
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Westerner, That is a beautiful Rolling Block. Who made it?
  
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #20 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 9:59pm
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Original action was a 40-50. John king installed the barrel and had the case colors done. Gene Gordner fit and finished the stocks. A lady I dont know did the checkering. I supplied the wood. MVA sights.

The barrel John originally fit did not shoot well at all using the blow tube. Had very shallow rifling. New barrel is a NOS Badger from Carmen Axtell. Caliber is 45-90. Dave Casey installed the Badger. Shoots like a sooped up wildcat. Cool
  

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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #21 - Nov 20th, 2021 at 11:53pm
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StanR5686 wrote on Nov 20th, 2021 at 5:44pm:
Since starting this thread and discussion, I have found that C. Sharps Arms in Big Timber, MT makes an 1885. Looks like they are entirely made there. Prices are from $600 to $800 more than the Italian replicas and are about the same as I知 seeing Miroku made Brownings and Winchesters for. Has anybody had any experience with C. Sharp 1885s? I would pay that difference if I knew it was a quality made rifle.


C. Sharps makes a great 1885. IMHO I would go C. Sharps over anything Italian or Japanese. Get the single set trigger C. Sharps offers and don't look back.....
  

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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #22 - Nov 21st, 2021 at 8:33am
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Westerner, count me another great admirer of your rolling block. The wood is outstanding, and so is the rest of the rifle.
  
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #23 - Nov 21st, 2021 at 7:22pm
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If you want to shoot it, I would studiously avoid the Ruger #3 in 45-70.  I know of one that went through four owners while using up less than half of a (20 round) box of ammo.  Enough said!  OTOH, a Ruger #1 is about the lightest package I would want to use to unleash a 45-70 downrange.

My personal choice for an original or reproduction in the caliber would be a high wall.  I have two originals that have been rebarreled to 45-70 with heavy octagon barrels.  Even with heavy barrels and well shaped stocks, shooting them is not for the faint of heart.

Froggie
  
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #24 - Nov 24th, 2021 at 3:00pm
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I started buying Pedersoli 1874 Sharps almost 30 years ago and now I have 5 rifes in 45/70, 45/90, 40/65, 50/70 and 50/90.

Then I bought a Hiwall 38/55 Target rifle. Which is best? Both types offer a world of fun, both have a camming action to seat that cartridge into the rifling and both are very accurate with a little tuning.

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50/70 Sharps at 100 yards

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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #25 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 5:21am
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George [/quote]
I'm glad you mentioned the Rolling Block. I was talking to a guy who was interested in doing some trading with me. He has a Pedersoli Rolling Block with good sights already on it. I had investigated those as well. [/quote]

I would stay away from the pedersoli regardless of flavor. The rolling blocks have sometimes heat treat problems and the hammers peen. The sharps are sometimes found without the ejection lug on the lever and do not operate correctly making loading a three-handed operation. Not to mention of course is that customer service with pedersoli is just about nil.

SS
  

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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #26 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 9:21am
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SS - - - that was the original poster who you quoted there, not me.   All my Remingtons are originals as are half my Sharps rifles.   I don't care for any of the imported copies of Remington, Sharps, or High Walls.  The only Pedersoli I have is one of their Mortimer flintlock rifles.   That must be the top of their line as it is very well made, looks good and shoots as good as it looks.

George
  
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #27 - Nov 25th, 2021 at 10:11pm
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Difficult choice, I have been mulling over the same.
  
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Re: 1874 Sharps vs. 1885 High Wall
Reply #28 - Nov 26th, 2021 at 10:09am
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For user-friendly practicality, it痴 the Winchester, hands-down. The mechanism cocks (or half-cocks) itself when the lever is cycled, the block has a modicum of camming action if the cartridge is a little swollen, the firing pin is straight, rugged and automatically retracts, and broken springs are an extreme rarity. Whether you池e right- or left-handed, function is the same. It can handle about any cartridge, black-powder or smokeless, with safety and (now that reworked varmint rifles are Cool) without being jarringly anachronistic.

You have to remember to put the Sharps on half-cock after firing or the pin tip will drag down the primer, cartridge case and barrel breech and might break off. The pin itself is complicated, and has been further complicated, depending on the manufacturer痴 ideas of how to minimize firing-pin tip damage. It also limits the intensity of the cartridges you may want to fire in it. Springs (especially the lever spring) have a propensity to break in the middle of an important shooting session, and holding the lever up while pulling the trigger is (for me anyway) a less-natural grip than that on the lever of the Winchester. Half- or full-cocking of the hammer is less convenient for lefthanders than righthanders.

On the other hand, the Cool factor of the Winchester is 9, with the Sharps a 10; and the historical-association factor of the Winchester is (maybe) a 5, while the Sharps is all the way up to 11.
  
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